Vol X: Accountability

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The final question I ask in the article, Setting the Stage is whether accountability exists within your organization, ensuring your employees feel fairly treated.

Accountability is being responsible for what you are expected to do and for the actions you take. Holding yourself and others accountable ensures that everyone fulfills their responsibility, and that there is fairness, making sure actions are applied consistently and without prejudice.

Understanding what you are accountable for.

The exact responsibilities will naturally vary based upon a persons role, but at a high level it breaks down into two categories:

Individual contributors or team members are responsible for their work and for supporting the rest of their team.

Leaders are responsible for the work of their entire team as well as for how they hold their team members accountable for their actions.

Understanding the expectations of one’s role sets the foundation for accountability. When your team members understand what you expect from them and what is expected of their peers, you’ve set the stage for creating consistent accountability. My article on Clarifying Expectations has some examples of things to consider when setting those expectations.

The next step, once expectations are clear, is to ensure your team members understand how they will be held accountable. There are two sides to accountability, most people think about the negative accountability – what happens when someone does not meet expectations; there is also a positive accountability – what happens when someone does a job well, or exceeds the expectations.

When employees do not meet the expectations that you’ve clearly defined, they should understand what that means in terms of coaching, feedback, and discipline.

For more ideas about positive accountability, I’d refer you to my last two articles: Motivation Through Recognition and Creating a Recognition Program.

The most important thing is that accountability, positive or negative, needs to be clearly communicated and applied consistently.

To evaluate your own accountability process, consider these questions:

  1. Does everyone have clear expectations of what their role is and what you need from them?

Without clear expectations, you have no foundation for accountability. Remember not to assume here, not everyone approaches situations the same way.

  1. Do you give feedback to employees? Do other leaders in the organization provide feedback? Do team members have an avenue for providing peer feedback?

Self-awareness is difficult for most people. If you are not giving feedback on performance, an employee can think they are doing something well, even if you do not agree.

  1. Do you have a consistent method of tracking employee performance? Is an employee’s performance transparent to them?

In environments where an employee may be supervised by several different leaders it is important that any coaching or feedback is documented so other leaders are aware and meaningful follow up can occur without being redundant.

  1. Is retraining or job shadowing available to help build performance for those who need it?

Not everyone gets it the first time. Having an opportunity to retrain employees after they’ve had some on the job experience might help an employee who didn’t quite connect the lessons of training with the real world environment.

  1. Are the steps that you take with one employee the same for all employees?

To be fair to all employees, the same steps should be taken, regardless of the person. For example, if with Mark you give several coaching opportunities and many chances but with Jane, her mistakes result in write-ups you are being unfair. That’s not to say that you need to write Mark up right away, but are you giving Jane the benefits of your time and feedback?

Employees want accountability to be consistent. By ensuring accountability is fair, employees can trust your actions and comfortably perform at higher levels.

Please join the conversation…